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Airline Management

Idiots everywhere! an Air China B737 Flight CA106 enroute from Hong Kong to Dalian in China, carrying 153 passengers and 9 crew members suddenly dropped to 10,000 feet, prompting oxygen masks to be deployed. The jetliner descended from 35,000 feet to 10,000 feet in just 10 minutes. co-pilot tried to hide the fact that he was smoking but accidentally shut off the air-conditioning, causing oxygen levels to fall. Shutting off the air conditioning units triggered an alarm and prompted the crew to perform an emergency pressure relief procedure, which then released the cabin’s oxygen masks. After the rapid descent, the crew realized the problem and reactivated the air conditioning, allowing cabin pressure to return to normal. Reportedly the pilot has been fired!

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Air China co-pilot caught smoking, caused emergency descent

AeroTime News Hub – July 14, 2018

 

 

 

An emergency descent made by an Air China passenger plane after the cabin lost pressure on July 10, 2018, had experts scratching their heads. Now, a preliminary investigation by China’s aviation regulator has attributed the incident to the co-pilot smoking an e-cigarette in the cockpit during the flight.

 

 

Air China Flight CA106 was on route from Hong Kong to Dalian in China, when the Boeing 737, carrying 153 passengers and nine crew members onboard, suddenly dropped to 10,000 feet, prompting oxygen masks to be deployed. The jetliner descended from 35,000 feet to 10,000 feet in just 10 minutes. It then ascended and continued to its destination at a peak altitude of 26,600 feet.

 

 

According to Reuters, the decision to climb again and continue the flight, rather than head to a nearby airport, was described as unusual by industry experts. The oxygen masks had already been deployed and there was a risk of another decompression event after the one-time supply of about 12-20 minutes from the oxygen masks was used up.

 

 

Although there were no injuries and the plane landed safely, the northeast bureau of the Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC) launched an investigation into the incident and found the co-pilot to be smoking an e-cigarette during the flight.

 

 

“Smoke diffused into the passenger cabin and relevant air conditioning components were wrongly shut off, without notifying the captain, which resulted in insufficient oxygen,” Qiao Yibin, an official of the CAAC’s aviation safety office, was quoted as saying at CAAC’s news conference by state-owned China News.

 

 

Investigators said that the co-pilot tried to hide the fact that he was smoking but accidentally shut off the air-conditioning, causing oxygen levels to fall, BBC News reports. Shutting off the air conditioning units triggered an alarm and prompted the crew to perform an emergency pressure relief procedure, which then released the cabin’s oxygen masks. After the rapid descent, the crew realized the problem and reactivated the air conditioning, allowing cabin pressure to return to normal.

 

 

Qiao promised to hand down “severe punishment in accordance with laws and regulations,” if the regulator’s final conclusion on the incident matches its initial finding, CNN News reports. Meanwhile, the state-backed Air China on its part said it would terminate the contracts of the flight crew involved in the incident, and suggested the CAAC to cancel their licenses.

 

 

According to Reuters, in 2006, China’s aviation regulations, which prohibit flight crew from “smoking on all phases of operation”, also banned passengers from smoking e-cigarettes on flights.

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I am a Canadian and EU national with an MBA and 33+ years experience in aviation business development with 20 years overseas and work in 30+ countries. A former investment/merchant banker (mergers and acquisitions to corporate turnarounds). airline and OEM senior executive and past owner of 6 successful aviation companies in 3 countries (executive jet charter/management companies, aircraft sales, aircraft broker, airline/aerospace consulting to aircraft insurance). I have a very diverse aviation background with 75+ aviation companies (50+ airlines of all sizes, OEM's, airports, lessors, MRO to service providers) as consultant, executive management, business analyst and business development adviser. Excellent success track record in International Business Development. Most work with airlines is with new start-ups and restructuring of troubled carriers. I sold new business jets, turboprops and helicopters for Cessna, Raytheon, Gulfstream to Eurocopter as an ASR as well as undertaking sales and marketing of commercial aircraft for Boeing, de Havilland, Dornier, Saab and Beechcraft. Brokered everything from LET-410's to B747's and from piston PA31 to G550 business jets. I look beyond the headlines of the aviation news and analyze what the meaning and consequences of the new information really means. There is a story behind each headline that few go beyond. Picked the name Aviation Doctor, as much of my work has been with troubled companies or those that want and need to grow profitably. I fix problems in the business for a better tomorrow. You can reach me with comments or suggestions at: Tomas.Aviation@gmail.com I write a lot of Articles and Posts on LinkedIN: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tomas-chlumecky-3200a021/

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